Where to buy Wagyu Beef in Lynden

Have you seen our cows?

Mary is due June 27, and we’re anxiously awaiting our first calf of the season. We anticipate three more babies to the herd this summer, along with a few additions from the neighboring farm. Our herd keeps growing and growing.

Glen has been very busy expanding their pasture, so they have more room to graze in the summer. It is essential to us to have all the animals on the field for the summer, and as our herd grows, we are implementing new ways to expand on our property.

Guests often ask us about our Wagyu cattle, so we thought we’d share a little of their history with you.

Wagyu cattle were first imported in 1975 when Morris Whitney imported two black and two red bulls. In 1989 the Japanese began to reduce their tariffs on imported beef and encouraged U.S. producers to produce a high-quality product for Japan.

In the 1990s, there were several importations of quality Wagyu, but in 1997, Japan declared the Wagyu breed a living national treasure and placed a ban on exports. Between the first cattle in 1976 and the export ban in 1997, less than 200 Wagyu were exported to the United States.

We are slowly growing our herd of Wagyu, so be sure to ask us questions during your stay and learn more about this breed.

 

We now have select cuts of meat available.  Email us for a price sheet. 

 

For more information on our Farmstead, check out our Local Guide, and be sure to enjoy your day before you head back north to your cozy getaway at the Oostema Farmstead.  We will keep the light on for you.

 

 

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